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Art Appreciation

 

 
Celebrated as one of America's preeminent landscape painters, Thomas Cole (1801–1848) was born in northern England at the start of the industrial revolution, immigrated to the United States in his youth, and traveled extensively throughout England and Italy as a young artist. He returned to America to create some of his most ambitious works and inspire a new generation of American painters. This exhibition will examine for the first time the artist's career in relation to his European roots and travels, establishing Cole as a major figure in 19th-century landscape art within a global context. Thomas Cole's Journey marks the 200th anniversary of Cole's first Atlantic crossing, when he emigrated from England to the United States in 1818, and examines in-depth Cole's return journey to England in 1829–31 and his travels in Italy in 1831–32, revealing the development of his artistic processes. Seminal works created by the artist in the years immediately after his return to New York, between 1832 and 1837—notably The Oxbow and The Course of Empire—are presented as a culminating creative response to his complex experiences of British art and society and of Italian history and landscape. In addition, Cole's abiding passion for the American wilderness resulted in his fervent visual warning in these paintings to his fellow American citizens of the harsh ecological cost of unchecked development of the land. This exhibition brings to prominence the dialogue between American and European artists in the mid-19th century by hanging Cole's work in direct juxtaposition with works he studied on his formative journey, including paintings by J. M. W. Turner and John Constable, among others. It concludes with an examination of Cole's extraordinary legacy in the work of the next generation of American landscape painters whom he personally mentored, notably Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church.

Schedule : Weekly - Mon 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM; starting 2/26/2018, ending 2/26/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Scarsdale Public Library Location : 
  Scarsdale Public Library.

Instructor : Page Knox 



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No movement develops in a complete vacuum.  Building upon the seventeenth and eighteenth century work of Rembrandt and William Hogarth, Édouard Manet broke new ground by defying traditional techniques of representation and by choosing subjects from the events and circumstances of his own time.  Acting as a lone wolf, he unlocked a door that enabled impressionism to happen. Edgar Degas was the only impressionist who bridged the gap between traditional academic art and the more radical artistic directions developing at the time.  Berthe Morisot, despite the protests of friends and family, tirelessly participated in the impressionists’ struggle for recognition.  This class will explore how and why these particular artists posed the initial challenges to 400-year-old tradition in order to develop a new voice.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 3/22/2018, ending 3/22/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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Starting from the premise that art is a concept, many post war artists have stripped aesthetics from their work and found the minimal path necessary to convey their message.  Artists have accomplished this by working with neon. We will look at works of important artists that have mastered the medium of neon to convey emotion and ideas and thereby expanded the definition of what constitutes art.  Practitioners to be studied include Yael Bartana, Glenn Ligon, James Clar, Dan Flavin, Tracey Emin, Ivan Navarro, Bruce Nauman, Lori Hersberger, Jung Lee, and others.  We will explore how these artists have pushed the boundaries of art and the neon medium.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM; starting 3/22/2018, ending 3/22/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Scarsdale High School Location : 
  Scarsdale High School.

Instructor : Ronnit Vasserman 



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This class is devoted to the lives and exquisite works of Claude Monet and Pierre-August Renoir.  Monet was the initiator, leader, and unswerving advocate of impressionism — a movement named after one of his own paintings, “Impression Sunrise” (1874).  Dedicated to capturing what he saw, when he saw it, and exactly how he saw it, Monet eventually became one of the most influential painters in the history of art.  But it was a hard won struggle.  It would take until the 1950s for Monet — and Impressionism — to finally be recognized as a significant art movement worthy of scholarship.  Renoir created snapshots of real life, full of beauty, sparkling color, and light.  In a world he believed was ugly, Renoir wanted to paint pretty pictures.  He is widely regarded as the world’s favorite artist — and the first to have a one-man exhibit at the Louvre in Paris, during his lifetime.

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 3/29/2018, ending 3/29/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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Celebrated as one of America's preeminent landscape painters, Thomas Cole (1801–1848) was born in northern England at the start of the industrial revolution, immigrated to the United States in his youth, and traveled extensively throughout England and Italy as a young artist. He returned to America to create some of his most ambitious works and inspire a new generation of American painters. This exhibition will examine for the first time the artist's career in relation to his European roots and travels, establishing Cole as a major figure in 19th-century landscape art within a global context. Thomas Cole's Journey marks the 200th anniversary of Cole's first Atlantic crossing, when he emigrated from England to the United States in 1818, and examines in-depth Cole's return journey to England in 1829–31 and his travels in Italy in 1831–32, revealing the development of his artistic processes. Seminal works created by the artist in the years immediately after his return to New York, between 1832 and 1837—notably The Oxbow and The Course of Empire—are presented as a culminating creative response to his complex experiences of British art and society and of Italian history and landscape. In addition, Cole's abiding passion for the American wilderness resulted in his fervent visual warning in these paintings to his fellow American citizens of the harsh ecological cost of unchecked development of the land. This exhibition brings to prominence the dialogue between American and European artists in the mid-19th century by hanging Cole's work in direct juxtaposition with works he studied on his formative journey, including paintings by J. M. W. Turner and John Constable, among others. It concludes with an examination of Cole's extraordinary legacy in the work of the next generation of American landscape painters whom he personally mentored, notably Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church.

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM; starting 4/11/2018, ending 4/11/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Scarsdale High School Location : 
  Scarsdale High School.

Instructor : Elizabeth Thompson Colleary 



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Camille Pissarro’s continuing belief in the value of independent group exhibitions, and his commitment to representing landscapes and urban scenes under specific weather and light conditions made him, in some ways, the quintessential impressionist.  Alfred Sisley was essentially a landscape painter, whose works can be distinguished from those of his colleagues by their softly harmonious values.  Georges Seurat and Paul Signac were neo-impressionists, who forged scientific, highly optical approaches to impressionist ideas (divisionism and pointillism), that would much later contribute to abstract art.

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 4/12/2018, ending 4/12/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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Paul Cézanne is rightly credited with paving the way for the emergence of twentieth century modernism, both visually and conceptually.  His work constitutes the most powerful and essential link between the ephemeral aspects of impressionism and the more materialist modern movements.  He laid the groundwork for what would ultimately become cubism.  Pablo Picasso, who was not overly generous with praise for other artists, dubbed Cezanne “the father of us all.”  Though his genius was not recognized until the last years of his life — and he was ridiculed and derided more than any other artist -- he had a vision and he remained determined to see it through, against all odds.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 4/19/2018, ending 4/19/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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Vincent van Gogh is generally considered to be one of the greatest Dutch painters of all time.  His work exerted a powerful influence on the development of much modern painting, in particular on fauvism and German expressionism.  The striking color, emphatic brushwork, and contoured forms of his work are wholly unique, visually captivating, emotionally stimulating, and widely collected.  Paul Gauguin, both a friend to and enemy of Van Gogh, sought to achieve a primitive expression of spiritual and emotional states in his work, largely through overlapping planes of color.  His influence on modern art was wide and varied.  Gauguin possessed an exceptional vision, tirelessly experimenting with new styles and approaches.  This class will explore the lives, legends, and works of both artists.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 4/26/2018, ending 4/26/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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This illustrated lecture explores street art, from 1970s New York City graffiti to gallery artists like Keith Haring, who utilized this artistic form of vandalism as a springboard to broadcast their own voices of contemporary culture.  All of the major metropolitan areas of the world boast a thriving, expressive community of artists who have taken their thoughts, observations, and opinions to the street.  From Miami to the US heartland, the West Bank to Reykjavik, some of the most talented and original artists in the world today like Banksy and Shepard Fairey embrace this vital, contemporary art form is embraced by .    

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM; starting 4/26/2018, ending 4/26/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Scarsdale High School Location : 
  Scarsdale High School.

Instructor : Martin Merchant 



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Fauvism refers to paintings invested with a strong expressive reaction to the subjects portrayed.  These artists used color in shocking and almost violent ways, giving rise to their being dubbed fauves or “wild beasts” by critic Louis Vauxcelles.  This class will study Henri Matisse, Maurice de Vlaminck, Raoul Dufy, Georges Rouault, and Kees van Dongen, among others, in the journey to discover the origins of this first movement of Modern Art.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 5/3/2018, ending 5/3/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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The most influential and misunderstood art movement of the twentieth century and beyond, cubism forever changed the way we see.  Largely created by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, cubism offered us a new reality through processes of disassembly, reassembly, and multiple perspectives.  In addition to the artwork of Picasso and Braque, this class will examine works by Juan Gris, Lyonel Feininger, Fernand Leger and Robert Delaunay, among others.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 5/10/2018, ending 5/10/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Jill Kiefer 



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The 1980s was notable for the AIDS epidemic, the Cold War, Gordon Gekko’s “greed is good’ attitude, the tech boom, NASA’s disastrous Challenger mission, Reagan’s assassination attempt, the fall of the Berlin wall, and the Wall Street crash.  This course will recap the cultural and political events of the decade and then examine the American artwork responsive to these events, such as those by Jean Michel Basquiat, Richard Prince, Keith Haring, Willem deKooning, Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger, Nan Goldin, Eric Fischl, Julian Schnabel, and others.  

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM; starting 5/15/2018, ending 5/15/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Scarsdale High School Location : 
  Scarsdale High School.

Instructor : Ronnit Vasserman 



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