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Literature, Film, Television and Theatre

 

 
Is this "the best of all possible worlds?"  Is the solution to "cultivate our own garden?"  Do we need Voltaire and his Candide more than ever?  For five Fridays this winter, heat up with this brilliant little novel!  Please use the paperback edition published by Bantam Classics in 1984 and translation by Lowell Barr.  

Schedule : Weekly - Fri 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM; 5 sessions; starting 1/12/2018, ending 2/9/2018

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Estha Weiner 



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With a career spanning over five decades and having won three Academy Awards as best director, William Wyler has been acclaimed by critics and fans of the classics as one of the greatest American filmmakers in the history or Hollywood.  This program will provide an opportunity to reflect on many memorable scenes from timeless classics including: Wuthering Heights, Roman Holiday, Ben Hur, Funny Girl, The Best Years of Our Lives, Mrs. Miniver, The Heiress and The Big Country.  Included in the presentation will be excerpts from interviews of prominent actors such as Gregory Peck, Bette Davis, Audrey Hepburn and Barbra Streisand reflecting on their experiences working “on the set” with Wyler and how his perfectionism and creative genius enhanced their performance in front of the camera.  

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM; starting 1/24/2018, ending 1/24/2018

Tuition: $20.00

Location : Temple Israel New Rochelle Location : 
  Temple Israel New Rochelle.

Instructor : Richard Knox 



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Add your voice to a discussion of short-story writer George Saunders’s first novel, set in the second year of the Civil War when both the South and North are losing their sons, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven year old son, Willie, dies of  typhoid fever, and is interred in a crypt in Georgetown.  “Bardo” is the Tibetan Buddhist term for the place where souls are destined for release or rebirth.  Young Willie is greeted by resident spirits of the Bardo that include a printer killed by a falling beam and a young man who committed suicide after he was rejected by the man he loved.  Boisterous discussion among the many spirits in the Bardo goes on for hours, intermittently humorous and heartbreaking.  With the exception of Reverend Everly Thomas, unaware they are dead, the spirits believe they are ill and may recover.  Inspired by Our Town, Saunders creates an original form, a community of voices, some comic, others tragic, expressing the stories of lives interrupted by accident, crime, or illness.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; starting 2/1/2018, ending 2/1/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Teacher's Home In Scarsdale Location : 
  Teacher's Home In Scarsdale.

Instructor : Harriet Sobol 



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Scarsdale Adult School welcomes celebrated author George Saunders whose first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, was the 2017 Man Booker Prize Winner.  Following his revered short story collections with this eagerly anticipated debut novel, Saunders continues to shake readers to the core.  An original and transcendent work, Lincoln in the Bardo unfolds over the course of a single night in a graveyard, narrated by a chorus of dazzling voices. Advanced registration is highly recommended.  Seating is limited and cannot be guaranteed for walk-ins.  Credit cards will not be accepted at the door. Books will be available for purchase at the event.  The author will be signing them upon request.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM; starting 2/8/2018, ending 2/8/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Scarsdale Public Library Location : 
  Scarsdale Public Library.

Instructor : N.A. 



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This registration includes one standard admission, plus a paperback copy of Lincoln in the Bardo which will be distributed on the evening of the event. Scarsdale Adult School welcomes celebrated author George Saunders whose first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, was the 2017 Man Booker Prize Winner.  Following his revered short story collections with this eagerly anticipated debut novel, Saunders continues to shake readers to the core.  An original and transcendent work, Lincoln in the Bardo unfolds over the course of a single night in a graveyard, narrated by a chorus of dazzling voices. Advanced registration is highly recommended.  Seating is limited and cannot be guaranteed for walk-ins.  Credit cards will not be accepted at the door. Books will be available for purchase at the event.  The author will be signing them upon request.  

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM; starting 2/8/2018, ending 2/8/2018

Tuition: $40.00

Location : Scarsdale Public Library Location : 
  Scarsdale Public Library.

Instructor : N.A. 



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This semester’s theme is films that focus on personal journeys, whether physical or emotional, that have captured audiences with the portrayals of desire, danger, patience, and success or failure.  Film screenings will include six of the following movies: Closely Watched Trains (1966), Ida (2013), Awakenings (1990), Les Innocents (1987), Sweet and Lowdown (1999), Cría Cuervos (Raise Ravens) (1976), Eternity and a Day (1998), Locke (2013), Brokeback Mountain (2005), Sundays and Cybèle (1962).

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM; 6 sessions; starting 3/20/2018, ending 5/1/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/3/2018)

Tuition: $120.00

Location : Hitchcock Presbyterian Church Location : 
  Hitchcock Presbyterian Church.

Instructor : Marilyn DeRight 



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This course focuses on poetry that addresses current issues of environmental change.  Appreciation of nature, including nostalgic and romantic views, has long been a staple of poetry.  Today, many contemporary poets are taking an activist stance, alert to environmental issues and the ways in which their poems might affect public policy.  We will discuss their different voices, as well as the new field of eco-poetics, and read poems that portray environmental risks and urge repair.  Issues to be considered include style and form of the poems, their grounding in environmental science, and similarities and differences with the influence of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring.  For a broad view of poetry that speaks to and for the natural world, see Can Poetry Save the Earth? by John Felstiner (Yale, 2009).  All welcome in this poetry discussion series.

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM; 5 sessions; starting 3/20/2018, ending 4/24/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/3/2018)

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Hitchcock Presbyterian Church Location : 
  Hitchcock Presbyterian Church.

Instructor : Ruth Handel 



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This class will read and discuss a dozen (two each week) varied, quality short stories that originally appeared in The New Yorker, a dependable source of talented writers.  Whether familiar or new, all selections will offer the pleasure of lively discussion.  Readings will be taken from the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker, edited by David Remnick with Susan Choi (Random House, 2000, available in paperback).  For the first class, please read Laurie Colwin’s “Another Marvelous Thing” and Jonathan Franzen’s “The Failure.”  Try to read each story twice, looking carefully at plot structure, character presentation, language and total effect.  

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM; 6 sessions; starting 3/21/2018, ending 5/2/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/4/2018)

Tuition: $180.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Marilyn DeRight 



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Each SAS semester, BookTalk introduces readers to a carefully chosen, provocative selection of novels for reading and informal discussion.  In this installment, we will consider the authors’ writing techniques and their characters’ personal journeys.  For the first meeting, please read Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan.  Later classes will be devoted to An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and an Epic by Daniel Mendelsohn (April 17 and 18), Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman (May 1 and 2), Less by Andrew Sean Greer (May 15 and 16), and The Signal Flame by Andrew Krivak (May 29 and 30).  

Schedule : Weekly - Tue 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; 5 sessions; starting 3/27/2018, ending 5/29/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/3/2018, 4/10/2018, 4/24/2018, 5/8/2018, 5/22/2018)

Please read: This class meets on 3/27, 4/17, 5/1, 5/15, ...More

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Teacher's Home In Scarsdale Location : 
  Teacher's Home In Scarsdale.

Instructor : Harriet Sobol 



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This class explores contemporary memoirs by writers from diverse social backgrounds.  How do authors translate lived experiences of childhood and family life, immigration, war, personal trauma, work and professional life, parenthood, and politics into compelling literary works?  How do they chronicle the creation of complex identities shaped by race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and geography?  Analyzing both the achievements and the limitations of the memoir genre, we will discuss how authors map the emotional landscape of private life while addressing broader themes in history, politics, and culture. This class features four very recent books, including a beautifully rendered graphic memoir.)  Come share your ideas with other passionate readers in a stimulating yet relaxed environment.  Reading list: The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, by Sherman Alexie, Real American by Julie Lythcott-Haims, and Hunger by Roxane Gay.    

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM; 4 sessions; starting 3/28/2018, ending 6/13/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/4/2018, 4/11/2018, 4/18/2018, 5/2/2018, 5/9/2018, 5/23/2018, 5/30/2018, 6/6/2018)

Please read: Class meets on: Four Wednesdays, 3/28, ...More

Tuition: $120.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Lori Rotskoff 



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Each SAS semester, BookTalk introduces readers to a carefully chosen, provocative selection of novels for reading and informal discussion.  In this installment, we will consider the authors’ writing techniques and their characters’ personal journeys.  For the first meeting, please read Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan.  Later classes will be devoted to An Odyssey: A Father, A Son, and an Epic by Daniel Mendelsohn (April 17 and 18), Dark at the Crossing by Elliot Ackerman (May 1 and 2), Less by Andrew Sean Greer (May 15 and 16), and The Signal Flame by Andrew Krivak (May 29 and 30).  

Schedule : Weekly - Wed 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM; 6 sessions; starting 3/28/2018, ending 5/30/2018 ; Class Skip Dates : (No class on 4/4/2018, 4/11/2018, 4/25/2018, 5/23/2018)

Please read: This class meets on 3/28, 4/18, 5/2, 5/16, ...More

Tuition: $150.00

Location : Teacher's Home In Scarsdale Location : 
  Teacher's Home In Scarsdale.

Instructor : Harriet Sobol 



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Join cultural historian Lori Rotskoff for a lively, interactive book discussion of Celeste Ng’s new novel Little Fires Everywhere.  Set in the placid suburb of Shaker Heights, Ohio, the story traces the intertwined fates of a picture-perfect family and a mysterious mother and daughter who move to town and upset the status quo of this carefully ordered community.  Developing themes of race, class, motherhood, and belonging through a cast of compelling characters and a suspenseful plot, Ng explores the complexities of modern family life, privacy, and privilege — as well as the explosive potential of untold secrets and the danger of believing that social conformity can prevent disaster.

Schedule : Weekly - Thu 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM; starting 4/19/2018, ending 4/19/2018

Tuition: $25.00

Location : Westchester Reform Temple Location : 
  Westchester Reform Temple.

Instructor : Lori Rotskoff 



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